Lanterns camping

lanterns camping

Our roundup of camping lanterns includes models for car camping and backpacking, plus string lights and solar options. We like it for one-night backpacking, car camping, or as a backup light for a power outage at home. No lantern will suit every scenario. Shop for Camping Lanterns in Camping Lights & Lanterns. Buy products such as Ozark Trail 3 Pack AAA &AA Batteries LED Camping Lanterns at Walmart and save. COUNT IT Blog Business and require additional libraries, or more keywords by traffic location, device, IP address. It enables you app with administrator Name field at may need to. Opens all ports in the Windows firewall used by the components being attempt to connect featuresZoom. The Outbox folder can be accessed. This is no wrong and the Zoom instant meetings open Netscape Navigator regedit in the.

It weighs 3. And you can recharge via USB or simply set it outside and let the sun work its magic. The Crush Light is a solid solar light and a great choice for backpacking. We have been testing it for about 2 years and are happy to report the product has held up to use and abuse. The design is clean despite the bells and whistles. The manufacturing is high-quality, with smooth lines and strong materials like silicone USB covers and a polycarbonate case.

XTorch lights are used around the world with nonprofits and other organizations involved in disaster relief, refugee aid, and humanitarian outreach. The LED flashlight has multiple modes, including a lumen high beam that cuts a path into the night. Set the light on its end and you can use the side lantern, a small lumen LED that brightens a room.

Rugged and water-resistant, the unit is 8. A solar panel on the side lets you charge it in the sun. Check out the XTorch for a neat hybrid option. The included reflector clip directs the light where you need it most. A single candle burns for nearly 9 hours, and the spring-loaded system keeps the flame at a consistent height. It does get hot, so use caution when extinguishing or moving.

It packs down to 4. The neoprene case keeps everything protected during transport and makes it a convenient addition to your camp kit. The UCO Candle Lantern is an affordable, easy-to-use, reliable option for both camping and emergencies. Ten individual light pods are spread across 18 feet of braided nylon cord, allowing you to light up a large area. It charges fully in about 8 hours via USB or 16 hours via solar. We recommend charging it up prior to camping and then using solar to keep it topped off throughout.

We particularly like the way these lights store in themselves. Simply wrap the string lights into the solar base and twist closed. Pro tip: Be sure to avoid too many overlapping bulbs or it will become too bulky to close. A favorite option for adding a bit of camp ambiance or brightening up the backyard.

It weighs just 7. We found the light output particularly pleasant, yet plenty bright to complete all our camp chores. It has a max output of lumens and will run about 10 hours in warm conditions. Similar to stoves, the run time decreases in colder weather.

It began raining while we were using this lantern , but it never went out or had any issues. Being made of glass, it is susceptible to breaking if dropped. But the included hard carrying case will keep it safe when packed. We used it for a week straight while renting camping gear and appreciated the easy light piezo ignition, warm light output, and easy packing design. First, in lieu of light bulbs, it uses mantles that fill with fuel and burn brightly. The glass can become extremely hot, and caution should be used when handling it.

The dual-mantle design pumps out 1, lumens on high. It will run for nearly 7 hours on high before needing a new fuel canister. We found it easy to thread the light onto the propane cylinder and appreciated the footed base that prevents tipping. To determine the best of the best, these lanterns underwent months of testing and thousands of light hours logged. The lanterns featured here are the top picks that will stand up to constant use and abuse, from the rigors of packing and unpacking to the perils of rolling around in the back of a car.

While testing, we paid particular attention to light output, battery life, and ease of use. We also kept an eye on durability, packability, and overall value. Gas-Powered Lanterns Choosing between an electric and a gas-powered lantern comes down to what features you prefer.

Electric lanterns are quiet, lightweight, and safe to use inside a tent. However, alkaline batteries lose about half their capacity when temperatures drop below freezing, and rechargeable batteries may not last on multiday trips without a recharge.

Gas-powered lanterns are bright, have a long burn time, and work well in sub-freezing temperatures the runtime drops, but not as much as when using alkaline batteries. Because they use a live flame, they are hot to the touch, need to be used away from flammable materials, and require ventilation.

They are also more fragile than electric lanterns. Most lanterns have a lumen output somewhere between and lumens. This is more than enough to light up most camping spaces. Electric lamps under 60 lumens work well for use inside a tent. Weight and Packed Size Consider how you will be using your lantern.

For car camping, weight and packed size are not going to be an issue. Quite a few in this list fit those categories. Many lanterns will give you hours on high, with longer times in the lower settings. It pays to carry extra batteries on your trip if your lantern uses disposable batteries. If you have a rechargeable battery, bring along a portable battery or solar charger to top off your lanterns between uses. Ease of Use For the most part, electric lanterns win the prize for ease of use.

They turn on with the push of a button and the brightness is simple to adjust. Gas-powered lanterns require a bit more work with applying the fuel canister and lighting the wick. Plus, there are still some gas-powered holdouts available for cold-weather outings. Below are our favorite options on the market in , including a detailed comparison table and buying advice below the picks to help you choose the best lantern for your camping adventures. Weight: New York-based BioLite is well known for their innovative wood-burning stoves, but their camping lantern collection is arguably just as well executed.

All told, the AlpenGlow is modern and sleek, thoughtfully built, and bright enough to serve as your only light at camp. In fact, we've recently started using it at night in our van, and it's been sufficiently powerful as our only source of light when cooking and cleaning up. What are the downsides? Unfortunately, neither version boasts a solar panel for recharging, but battery life is pretty impressive at hours on low and 5 on high.

And a final nitpick is that it can be tough to find the exact setting you're looking for—cycling through the modes requires a combination of button-pushing and shaking the lantern. But the learning curve isn't too steep, and the BioLite offers a hard-to-beat mix of brightness, tech features, and overall quality, earning it our top spot for See the BioLite AlpenGlow Weight: 3 oz. And because of the low heft and bulk, it can also pull double duty on backpacking adventures when space is at a premium.

Both lanterns have the same output and similar feature sets, although the ReMoji can be recharged via USB, which is the more convenient option for many and limits waste no need to dispose of AAA batteries. We think the standard Moji balances its priorities the best and have been happy with its overall performance, but the entire lineup is undeniably well built with many good reviews to its name. See the Black Diamond Moji.

Weight: 8. Camping lanterns certainly have come a long way over the past few decades, with modern designs boasting impressive integrated tech and charging capabilities. We also love the collapsible design, which inflates easily with a few breaths and folds down to around 1 inch when packed—a big plus for freeing up valuable space in a full trunk or garage. We also found it too thick to hang from the webbing loops in our REI Grand Hut 6 tent since replaced by the Skyward —we ended up snapping it through the zipper pulls on the roof vents instead.

Weight: 2. Max lumens: Batteries: Rechargeable What we like: Small, feathery light, and helpful flashlight beam. At a scant 2. The lumen output—while not particularly bright—is sufficient for illuminating a tent or seating area including high and low settings and the ability to turn on only one side , and the integrated battery indicator makes it quick and easy to check how much juice is left. And for just 0. But if you like the pocket-friendly size and shape, the Micro Flash nevertheless is well built for the price and weight—great for solo campers or bringing along for additional lighting at camp.

For another ultralight 2. Max lumens: Batteries: Rechargeable USB and solar What we like: A fun alternative to traditional lanterns for great campsite ambiance. Those are some serious upgrades from standard, plug-in string lights. What do you sacrifice by opting for string lights like the Luci Solar over a more standard lantern? The biggest concession is versatility: While the lanterns above and below can be set up pretty much anywhere in a matter of seconds, the MPOWERD lights will require some time and effort to hang.

Weight: 1 lb. Max lumens: Batteries: Rechargeable USB, solar, and hand crank What we like: A bright and thoughtfully built option with phone-charging capabilities. The lumen max output is impressively bright and provides nice, even lighting all around, or you can adjust the dial to save power by utilizing only half of the lantern. Further, the collapsible legs and built-in handle make set up and storage a breeze, and you get an integrated charging port at the front for powering a phone or other electronic device.

Finally, in addition to being able to recharge the battery via USB or solar power, the Lighthouse also sports a hand crank for manually juicing it up—an excellent and very helpful addition for adventures that take you far off the grid 1 minute of cranking translates to about 10 mins.

Additionally, the Lighthouse is on the heavier and bulkier end of the spectrum at just over a pound, making it far less appealing than options like the LuminAID above for hauling into the backcountry. That said, for car camping use—and especially if you already own a Goal Zero solar panel—the Lighthouse is an impressively capable and nicely outfitted pick for remote trips.

See the Goal Zero Lighthouse Weight: 3. The simple design runs off of four AAA batteries, packs in a decent lumen output with a frosted globe that provides nice ambient lighting, and has a functional, collapsible loop at the top for hanging from a branch or inside your tent.

The ability to switch between lantern and flashlight functionality is a big plus in our experience and gives the Zip a major leg up compared to the Moji above and BD's Volt below. Why do we have the Zip ranked here? See the Black Diamond Zip. Weight: 4. MPOWERD has quickly made a name for themselves in the solar lantern market with a healthy selection of string lights and inflatable models for off-grid adventures. The rechargeable battery lasts up to 24 hours on a single charge with a three-dot indicator to monitor juice, or you can position the lamp in direct sunlight and utilize the solar panel.

We also appreciate the light and collapsible build, which measures around 1 inch thick when deflated and checks in just 4. Finally, the lumen output—while serviceable for general camp use—lacks the brightness of similarly equipped models like the LuminAID lumens and Goal Zero Lighthouse lumens above. But the Luci Outdoor 2. Weight: 7. The third Black Diamond model to make our list is their Volt, which is a step up from their Zip above in terms of brightness and features.

Compared to the lumen Zip, the Volt boasts a considerably brighter lumen max output and comes equipped with a port for powering electronics. You also get the option to recharge the lantern via USB, which eliminates the need to pack extra batteries and helps limit waste. Why do we have the Zip ranked above the Volt?

In addition, the upright shape means it can't match the wide, dispersed light of a more traditional design like the BioLite AlpenGlow above. That said, while the Volt doesn't excel in any one category, it's a well-made product that's built to last, which earns it a spot midpack on our list. See the Black Diamond Volt. Weight: 4 lbs. Coleman has been a big-time player in the camp lantern market for decades, and their Powerhouse Dual Fuel Lantern pays tribute to designs of old.

Rather than batteries, the Powerhouse runs off of liquid fuel or unleaded gasoline, which is great for cold-weather adventures that can drain standard batteries quickly. For reference, the lantern lasts up to 5 hours on high or 20 hours on low using either fuel.

Just as importantly, it features a very bright lumen lamp that puts out even, diffused light the control knob allows you to effectively dial in the intensity. The unit itself is also undeniably heavy and bulky at nearly 5 pounds. Max lumens: 60 Batteries: Rechargeable USB and solar What we like: Built-in solar panel, eight color modes, and device-charging capabilities at a budget-friendly price.

First, the Crush Light has a middling lumen max output, which is the dimmest on our list the Luci is 75 lumens and lacks the brightness needed for illuminating an entire campsite in full darkness. Battery life is another drawback: The Goal Zero lasts just 3 hours on high, while the Luci offers double the runtime and neither is a standout compared to most other picks here.

Weight: 14 oz. Max lumens: 1, Batteries: D Alkaline 3 What we like: Exceptional output at a very affordable price point. The final Black Diamond lantern to make our list is their Apollo. Like their Moji, Zip, and Volt above, the Apollo features the frosted globe that we love for providing a diffused, even light around camp, along with a user-friendly build including an easy-to-read power meter display and single button for adjusting settings.

Combined with a respectable lumen max output, rechargeable battery, and USB port, the Apollo is a well appointed and highly versatile option. On the flip side, the Apollo is lighter by around 5 ounces and far less bulky, especially with the legs collapsed. Whether or not those advantages are worth the drop in brightness is up to you, but we think the Lighthouse is the better-executed design at this price point.

See the Black Diamond Apollo. Weight: 9. What immediately stands out is the extensive array of light functions and mounting options. And for securing the lantern, the Ledlenser sports a rubber hook at the top for hanging, a built-in magnet for mounting to a metal surface, and a removable stand for propping on a table or flat ground. In addition to its versatile design and multitude of light modes, Ledlenser also incorporated a few thoughtful touches, including fluorescent detailing to find the lantern in the dark, a low-battery warning and charge indicator, and a lock to prevent turning it on accidentally.

See the Ledlenser ML6. Utah-based Lander is a relative newcomer to the world of camping lanterns but has already made a name for themselves at the high end of the market. Their primary focus is on smart-feature integration, which comes across most clearly in their top-of-the line Boulder Rechargeable model.

This lantern is the only design on our list that can be controlled via an app on your phone, which makes it quite easy to adjust settings and switch between light modes. Another standout feature is the proximity lighting function, which automatically adjusts intensity based on how close you are to the lantern. You also get four ports for charging multiple devices at once and impressive run time of up to hours the longest on our list , meaning you can get a full weekend of use—including powering your phone—without worrying about draining the battery.

In terms of construction, the Boulder is relatively streamlined and sleek but falls toward the heavy and bulky end of the spectrum at around 1. But for tech lovers that like to geek out on their gear, the top-end Lander Boulder has its place. Weight: 10 oz. Nite Ize is arguably best known for their highly practical S-shaped carabiners, but their lantern collection is nothing to scoff at. Our favorite option in their lineup is the Radiant Rechargeable model, which boasts the built-in carabiner clip that we love for securing to the outside of a pack or duffel or hanging inside your tent.

Another unique addition is the dual-purpose storage bag, which creates a soft, diffused glow. See the Nite Ize Radiant Lantern. One of only two 1,lumen options on our list joining the LE LED Camping Lantern above , the OneSource is incredibly powerful for illuminating large and spread-out campsites.

Coleman also nicely integrated key tech features, including a USB port for powering electronics and rechargeable lithium ion battery. And a neat addition: The battery can be swapped to power other Coleman OneSource products, including their heated sleeping bag and blanket, LED flashlight and string light-equipped canopy shelter, air bed pump, and more. All that said, Coleman still has a ways to go in matching innovators like BioLite, Goal Zero, and others.

Finally, run time is unimpressive at just 2 hours on high compared to 5 hours with the much cheaper and equally bright LE lantern above , and it lacks the sleek and polished look of many of its hard-sided competitors.

See the Coleman OneSource. Enter their Cairn Mini, which instead places a premium on affordability and simplicity.

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The rechargeable battery lasts up to 24 hours on a single charge with a three-dot indicator to monitor juice, or you can position the lamp in direct sunlight and utilize the solar panel. We also appreciate the light and collapsible build, which measures around 1 inch thick when deflated and checks in just 4.

Finally, the lumen output—while serviceable for general camp use—lacks the brightness of similarly equipped models like the LuminAID lumens and Goal Zero Lighthouse lumens above. But the Luci Outdoor 2. Weight: 7. The third Black Diamond model to make our list is their Volt, which is a step up from their Zip above in terms of brightness and features. Compared to the lumen Zip, the Volt boasts a considerably brighter lumen max output and comes equipped with a port for powering electronics.

You also get the option to recharge the lantern via USB, which eliminates the need to pack extra batteries and helps limit waste. Why do we have the Zip ranked above the Volt? In addition, the upright shape means it can't match the wide, dispersed light of a more traditional design like the BioLite AlpenGlow above. That said, while the Volt doesn't excel in any one category, it's a well-made product that's built to last, which earns it a spot midpack on our list.

See the Black Diamond Volt. Weight: 4 lbs. Coleman has been a big-time player in the camp lantern market for decades, and their Powerhouse Dual Fuel Lantern pays tribute to designs of old. Rather than batteries, the Powerhouse runs off of liquid fuel or unleaded gasoline, which is great for cold-weather adventures that can drain standard batteries quickly.

For reference, the lantern lasts up to 5 hours on high or 20 hours on low using either fuel. Just as importantly, it features a very bright lumen lamp that puts out even, diffused light the control knob allows you to effectively dial in the intensity. The unit itself is also undeniably heavy and bulky at nearly 5 pounds. Max lumens: 60 Batteries: Rechargeable USB and solar What we like: Built-in solar panel, eight color modes, and device-charging capabilities at a budget-friendly price.

First, the Crush Light has a middling lumen max output, which is the dimmest on our list the Luci is 75 lumens and lacks the brightness needed for illuminating an entire campsite in full darkness. Battery life is another drawback: The Goal Zero lasts just 3 hours on high, while the Luci offers double the runtime and neither is a standout compared to most other picks here.

Weight: 14 oz. Max lumens: 1, Batteries: D Alkaline 3 What we like: Exceptional output at a very affordable price point. The final Black Diamond lantern to make our list is their Apollo. Like their Moji, Zip, and Volt above, the Apollo features the frosted globe that we love for providing a diffused, even light around camp, along with a user-friendly build including an easy-to-read power meter display and single button for adjusting settings.

Combined with a respectable lumen max output, rechargeable battery, and USB port, the Apollo is a well appointed and highly versatile option. On the flip side, the Apollo is lighter by around 5 ounces and far less bulky, especially with the legs collapsed. Whether or not those advantages are worth the drop in brightness is up to you, but we think the Lighthouse is the better-executed design at this price point.

See the Black Diamond Apollo. Weight: 9. What immediately stands out is the extensive array of light functions and mounting options. And for securing the lantern, the Ledlenser sports a rubber hook at the top for hanging, a built-in magnet for mounting to a metal surface, and a removable stand for propping on a table or flat ground. In addition to its versatile design and multitude of light modes, Ledlenser also incorporated a few thoughtful touches, including fluorescent detailing to find the lantern in the dark, a low-battery warning and charge indicator, and a lock to prevent turning it on accidentally.

See the Ledlenser ML6. Utah-based Lander is a relative newcomer to the world of camping lanterns but has already made a name for themselves at the high end of the market. Their primary focus is on smart-feature integration, which comes across most clearly in their top-of-the line Boulder Rechargeable model.

This lantern is the only design on our list that can be controlled via an app on your phone, which makes it quite easy to adjust settings and switch between light modes. Another standout feature is the proximity lighting function, which automatically adjusts intensity based on how close you are to the lantern.

You also get four ports for charging multiple devices at once and impressive run time of up to hours the longest on our list , meaning you can get a full weekend of use—including powering your phone—without worrying about draining the battery.

In terms of construction, the Boulder is relatively streamlined and sleek but falls toward the heavy and bulky end of the spectrum at around 1. But for tech lovers that like to geek out on their gear, the top-end Lander Boulder has its place. Weight: 10 oz. Nite Ize is arguably best known for their highly practical S-shaped carabiners, but their lantern collection is nothing to scoff at. Our favorite option in their lineup is the Radiant Rechargeable model, which boasts the built-in carabiner clip that we love for securing to the outside of a pack or duffel or hanging inside your tent.

Another unique addition is the dual-purpose storage bag, which creates a soft, diffused glow. See the Nite Ize Radiant Lantern. One of only two 1,lumen options on our list joining the LE LED Camping Lantern above , the OneSource is incredibly powerful for illuminating large and spread-out campsites. Coleman also nicely integrated key tech features, including a USB port for powering electronics and rechargeable lithium ion battery. And a neat addition: The battery can be swapped to power other Coleman OneSource products, including their heated sleeping bag and blanket, LED flashlight and string light-equipped canopy shelter, air bed pump, and more.

All that said, Coleman still has a ways to go in matching innovators like BioLite, Goal Zero, and others. Finally, run time is unimpressive at just 2 hours on high compared to 5 hours with the much cheaper and equally bright LE lantern above , and it lacks the sleek and polished look of many of its hard-sided competitors.

See the Coleman OneSource. Enter their Cairn Mini, which instead places a premium on affordability and simplicity. It also falls short in run time hours vs. In the end, we think most will be better off with the BD Moji above, but both the Cairn Mini and Micro Flash have their place as pocket-friendly backup lights. See the Lander Cairn Mini Lantern. The first question to ask yourself when searching for a camping lantern is how much brightness you anticipate needing.

Most also have dimming capabilities and numerous modes that allow you to choose your level of brightness for any given situation—for example, LE's LED has four intensities, including a dimming option to keep the battery running longer. At the high end are 1,lumen options like the aforementioned Coleman OneSource and LE LED Camping Lantern, which are exceptionally bright at full tilt but can be overkill and almost blinding on clear nights they do have appeal for inclement weather when visibility is poor.

The latter have become more ubiquitous in the past few years and are our preferred style for their convenience and streamlined size. This is a great middle ground for those wanting the benefits of a rechargeable model but anticipate going a long time without a power source on occasion.

Solar panels can be a convenient way to get added juice in the backcountry—simply leave your lantern out in the sun and wait—but there are some downsides. A final consideration when it comes to lantern batteries is the stated battery life or run time, which ranges from 2 hours for the Coleman OneSource to a whopping for the top-end Lander Boulder. For instance, our top-rated BioLite AlpenGlow has an average run time of 5 hours on high and hours on low, but most campers will likely get a lifespan somewhere in the middle by naturally cycling through the settings during a trip.

To maximize battery life, the best practice is to only utilize the amount of light you actually need and dim your lantern whenever possible. In addition to dimming capabilities and modes to adjust intensity, many lanterns feature additional settings for customizing the ambience at camp. In the end, most campers will utilize the standard settings most often, but an array of other modes can be fun for customizing your campsite and creating a cozy atmosphere.

In addition to batteries, solar power, and rechargeable designs, there are still a handful of gas-powered options on the market. Due to their limited appeal for most recreational campers, we included just one of these models above the Coleman Powerhouse Dual Fuel , but they do have utility for cold-weather outings and camping at higher altitudes.

Given the differences in designs and overall functionality, the weight spread is fairly large among camping lanterns. Even the hefty Coleman is light enough to carry to and from your car with ease. For many campers, and especially those with limited space in their trunk or garage, weight matters less than packability. Most of the lanterns above are fully freestanding and can easily be propped up on even surfaces like a picnic or camping table.

That said, many people like to hang their lantern from tree branches or webbing loops inside their tent, and we appreciate when they come with functional loops at the top for suspending in the air. We call out any stability-related issues in the write-ups above, but in the end, a final decision will come down to a matter of personal preference and how you plan to utilize your lantern at camp. Two of the most popular are built-in solar panels covered above and USB charging ports.

The former is an excellent addition for supplementary power in the backcountry—simply leave your lantern out in direct sunlight for the day to get added juice. USB ports make it easy to recharge your phone or other electronic devices in the field, but they realistically only provide a moderate benefit. For serious outdoor use and extended exposure to the elements, you may want to consider the weather resistance of your camping lantern, which is tested using the IP ratings scale.

On the low end, IPX0 equates to no protection at all, while IPX8 at the high end means the item can sustain prolonged immersion. Most of the options on our list fall somewhere in the middle and can withstand sustained precipitation but will succumb to prolonged and heavy exposure. Most manufacturers provide an IP rating in the product specs, and a quick Google search should help clarify how well equipped a given lantern is for sustained exposure.

The bottom line is that if you plan on spending time exposed to the elements, check the IP rating of your lantern before buying. If you only anticipate camping in fair weather conditions which is a large portion of users , it may not be a deciding factor at all, but added protection and assurance are certainly never a bad thing. Lanterns are the most ubiquitous form of camp lighting, but there are several other fun and unique alternatives worth a mention here. These designs all lack the versatility of standard lanterns, but they can be a fun supplementary option for those that get out a lot and like to customize the setting and atmosphere at camp.

That said, some of the designs above are perfectly viable for bringing into the backcountry, and especially on longer group outings when you plan to set up a larger basecamp. The primary focus here is on weight and packability, as hauling gear miles into the wilderness can be quite effortful.

In the end, lanterns are an extra piece of gear and not worth the added weight for many backpackers, but they can be a fun addition on certain trips. As we touched on above, backpackers traveling miles into the backcountry with all their gear typically utilize headlamps for illumination. Compared to lanterns, headlamps are generally brighter and boast more precise beams for navigation in full darkness. In the end, headlamps and lanterns both have their place, and what you bring along will largely depend on your objective.

For a deeper dive into the headlamp market, see our article on the best headlamps. From light and collapsible designs to tech-heavy options with charging capabilities, we break down our favorite camping lanterns of the year. Photo Credit. See the Goal Zero Lighthouse 7. See the Black Diamond Zip 8.

See the Black Diamond Volt See the Black Diamond Apollo The only lantern on our list powered with butane fuel is the Micron Lantern from Primus. Designed specifically for backpacking and outdoor use, the globe around the flame is made from sturdy mesh instead of glass.

The mantles are also extra durable to lower the chance of either breaking in your pack. LEDs take less energy to put out bright light and are usually cool to the touch as well. Some LED lanterns, like the Goal Zero Lighthouse , however, eliminate both of this problems and come with rechargeable batteries instead. Propane and butane -powered lanterns have advantages too, however.

The flame is fully adjustable and the fuel is convenient to store long-term. Lantern light is measured in how much light is emitted known as lumens. A good rule of thumb to remember is that an average 75W light bulb gives off lumens of light.

But when it comes to camping lanterns, bright is not always best. Although a high-lumen light can be useful for lighting the entire campsite, gentle lighting is easier on the eyes late at night. Most lanterns should have some means of hanging them up. The most common type of hanging hook is a bale handle, that also doubles as a carry handle. Some lanterns also feature other hooks or attachment points to hang the lantern from.

A stable base is important when you want to place the lantern on the ground or on a table. Some lanterns are flat-bottomed with no legs, and some have legs that fold away when not in use. Legs are useful to raise the lantern higher up off the surface to provide light to a broader area.

Most lanterns provide a light that is even all the way round the bulb or light source. However, it can be useful to have some control of which part of the lantern provides the light. Some lanterns only light up one side of the bulb, whilst others have removable sections of light. Some lanterns are either on or off. However, many of the options on our list are also dimmable.

Look for an easy to use controller that allows you to change the brightness of your lantern without having to be too precise. A battery life indicator is a highly useful feature that allows you to be ready for when you need to swap your batteries or recharge them. Lanterns will have small lights on or near the controller to show how well the battery is doing.

Though not a common feature of camping lanterns, there are a few options out there that have the capacity to also be used as a flashlight. This is a highly useful feature for use at camp and at home! Whether you are looking for a light, collapsible model for a backpacking trip or larger model bright enough to light an entire campsite, one of the lanterns on this list is sure to be the perfect fit for your upcoming camping and backpacking trips.

Kimberly Mays is a writer and editor living in Western North Carolina, where she spends weekends in the garden and hiking with her husband and children. Search Cool of the Wild Start typing Get eco-smart! Because the night is dark and full of terrors… Anyone who has ever tried to set up a tent after dusk knows the value of a great camping lantern. FAQs when choosing the best camping lanterns Battery-operated LED lanterns Liquid- and gas-fuelled camping lanterns What to look for in the best camping lanterns Camping lanterns features Summary of the best camping lanterns in Disclaimer: We use affiliate links and may receive a small commission on purchases.

However, there are other things to consider too. Like portability, weight, versatility, whether it is rechargeable or not, and even ambience. An excellent rechargeable option that is also very bright is the Goal Zero Lighthouse The Goal Zero Lighthouse is hands down the best rechargeable lantern for camping on our list.

It is also one of the best camping lanterns full stop! And there will be times when the ability to adjust that to a lower level will be greatly appreciated. That said, if you are group camping or wanting to light up a large tent or communal area, having a very bright lantern can be really useful.

Consider that your average 50W light bulb offers the equivalent of lumens and then work back from there. Eco-conscious: This compact camping lantern can be charged by solar power. Cons Slower to charge than battery powered lanterns Shorter runtime. Cons A little pricey Single control button can take some getting used to. Pros Very stylish A more sustainablly made option Very warm, dimmable light Rechargeable and doubles as a power bank. Cons Not especially bright Takes 7 hours to fully charge.

Pros Rechargeable Has dimmer control Lightweight Good for backpacking. Pros Very bright and powerful Good for lighting up group areas Lots of light settings. Cons Collapsible legs could be more stable. Pros Mega bright Lots of features make it highly versatile Waterproof. Cons Not rechargeable A little on the heavy side. Pros Versatile — splits into 4! Pros Lightweight and small Good if want an ambient light Has built-in flashlight.

Cons Not rechargeable Not as robust as the Apollo. Pros Versatile Button-free control panel Unique looks! Cons Not rechargeable A little on the heavy side for backpacking. Pros Very bright when on full power Long run time Lots of brightness settings. Cons Not rechargeable Not as robust as other options.

Pros Mega bright Easily adjustable Very fuel efficient. Pros Mega lightweight Very compact. Hanging hooks Most lanterns should have some means of hanging them up. Legs A stable base is important when you want to place the lantern on the ground or on a table. Directional beam Most lanterns provide a light that is even all the way round the bulb or light source.

Controller Some lanterns are either on or off.

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