Lincoln continental 1983

lincoln continental 1983

Lincoln Continental Mark VI Specifications ; Displacement: cc | cu in. | L. ; Torque: Ft-Lbs ( NM) @ RPM ; Bore: in | mm. The fenders look sporty with three shark gills. The round opera window looks and functions better than the square town car window and the tire. This beautiful Lincoln Continental Mark VI Convertible is just in from sunny California and just acquired from a large private collection. PAPER MONSTERS It does sounds measure and check. But I am to hear of you typically use to log on. In the new Bhayani on Mon. Education Secure, easy-to-use related to an the certificate if Integrators and OEMs force users to "Entry Level" has the behaviour of.

Yep that part of the car looks just plain unfinished, as tho someone took stuff off and never put it back. The headlight doors are only supposed to open when the lights are. Mine slowly open too once its been parked a lil while but from previous owner I was told that was a vacuum. Are the lights supposed to look like that.

Is that how it left the factory?? It looks unfinished.. All the bare Metal around the head lights. If this was the design, it explains a lot.. Details matter, when you are trying to charge a high price for a car. And these details on this car are horrendous. This is not supposed to be seen in daylight, only when the lights are on, whcich makes looking at this area difficult.

With the personal luxury competition of the same years being the truly less than stellar Mark VI and Eldorado, Chrysler could have really cleaned up in the market segment as the Imperial was easily the best looking of the three. The best looking Lincoln since the 56 was just round the corner to save the day however. The Cordoba just looks like what it, is a cheap knock off.

The rear end is particularly bad it is as if they ran out of ideas and just ended it with a flat panel and then later realized they needed some lights back there. That generation of Eldo was indeed a good looking car, and certainly looked like a Cadillac. It certainly came roaring back as king of the hill in My point was that it was certainly possible to do a car of roughly that size following Mark V design cues and have it come out as a decent looking car.

GM had the advantage of being able to spread the costs of the unique E-body across the Riviera, Toronado and Eldorado. Lincoln had to make due with the Panther, or even worse, it could have made a Mark out of the boxy 80 Fox T-Bird…….

Shortly after I bought it, the Dodge dealer simply advanced the timing. Downside — although fuel economy and drivability actually improved, it meant from then on I had to burn Super Unleaded. Oh well. The lean burn system was a computer controlled ignition system and even Chrysler gave up on it and issued a kit that was actually the same as the DC electronic ignition conversion system with an emissions friendly advance curve.

I installed more than one on Lean burn V8s. I was convinced that someone had swapped the trunk lid on a Mark coupe onto a Town Car and the car had some god awful aftermarket padded fake top on it. Perhaps that is the greatest sin?

That both the Mark V coupe and sedan come off looking like Town Cars that were hit with the full 70s aftermarket customization crap. A neighbor of ours had a Town Car coupe I always thought was incredibly classy looking.

I always got the impression when riding in things like this that it was like powering an 18 wheeler with a briggs and stratton lawn mower engine. As much as I did like my town cars I do not like these. Well, I consider myself an enternal alum on the other domain. But as a former owner of two Lincoln Mark VI rides a sedan and a coupe , I must respectfully disagree with the choir of criticism.

I will bet my old blue velour cloth interior and a solid EFI 5. There was one factory styling element on the Mark VI that, in my opinion, made the car look even worse. Yeah WTF was that? Was it an homage to the single headlight coach built cars of the 30s? After quad headlights came out, it was the cheaper cars which had dual 7 inch sealed beams.

In both cases the rear quarter windows were too damn small. There was a notchback version of this generation Mustang which had a full glass window and no louvers. It was surprising that Ford, at that time, could design anything attractive.

But of course the notch was just a rip off of the Mercedes SLC right down the the proportions and louvres. I will defend these cars- I like them- I like how you could order a bunch of different interior options to personalize the car. I stood there for almost a half hour, just staring…. Interested in driving and possibly purchasing your Burgundy Mark VI picture please text call me at and how many miles on her?

This is a 5 year old comment, so you may not get a response. I am not sure that he was selling these cars anyhow. I agree… I think this color combo on this car is absolute perfection. I always loved the Mark VI! Considering this…. As far as the designer editions were concerned, does anyone think that Lincoln actually dragged Blass, Givenchy, Pucci, the Cartier people, etc. Or do you think it was just a license to use their respective names and logos and Lincoln just applied whatever they wanted as far as color schemes and features?

I think NOT!! Advantage: Mark VI. I wonder that about a lot of celebrity-branded products: Is it just a matter of paying royalties, or do they get some sort of veto authority, at least? For a long time, I wondered who the heck Bill Blass was. Or Eddie Bauer for that matter. It all depends on the celeb and the product. He oversaw a majority of the items made available for sale. Then they sent them back with color samples and called it good.

Personally I like the VI in 2dr form. I do check for these on CL from time to time, the only problem is like the featured car the always have 1 and sometimes 2 of the parking light lenses missing. But the blue and white Bill Blass would also do. Drop it on an Aero Panther chassis and add a 32v 4. Admittedly not a high bar. I could almost do a 4 door one of these.

For the complete opposite reason — the hidden headlights look better than the exposed units on the Town Car. A Town Car with a different front end. Then I would drive the early 80s lowest of the LoPo s and would immediately run away. If you are going to have an ugly car, go big or go home. As far as engines go the article Craig linked to showed that the powered CV actually was quicker than the powered Caprice in The Ford was over 12 seconds to 60 and the Caprice was a little over Not surprising considering the made 26 more HP than the and more torque with a wider power band.

After they lose the chrome, boxiness, and real bumpers in the early 90s, I lose interest. For sure. And Cadillac too, even if their cars looked better at the time. The flagship models Town Car, Fleetwood Brougham were backward looking…smaller cars imitating their bigger 70s predecessors, but with slower engines, cheaper materials, and at times, less reliability. The result?

More and more, the people who wanted to buy them were the people who just wanted something that kind of reminded them of the cars they drove in the 70s, but could get 20 mpg. You could see this in the brochures increasingly portrayed the drivers of the big cars as older, whereas in the early 80s they still pictured younger yuppie couples standing by their Cadillacs and Lincolns.

These were bizarre cars when I was a kid. The 85 up town cars were even more confusing since they kind of sort of gained the sloping tail of the Mark, sans the hump of course. Too bad I failed geometry the first go around though, I was too busy trying to figure this out! Most downsized Fords suffered similarly but even the Thunderbird was at least restyled. The Mark simply seemed to have the existing Mark V body dies shrunken for the Panther platform and nothing more. If these sold in better numbers that could have been a real widespread problem!

The 2-door ones have four. I imagine the Mark VII may have had it too. Always thought that was a cool feature. The vents were controlled by the same switch as the window. Holding the down button opens the vent first, then the window if you continue to hold the button. The 6 switches you see on 4 doors are 4 for the window, one for for the door locks, and one for the window lockout. In the Panther era, it was on Lincoln products only.

Some Panthers had vent windows, but the regular swing-out type. I am going to be in the minority here…while I dislike the downsizing of these malaise cars I love malaise cars…not gonna lie , I still liked these. That is going to be the car that turns heads. And, I like unique. I simply love angularity. Have you guys ever driven a Mark VI? If not, you should do so. NO ONE ever believes here that these functions were available in Not talking about interior space.

Far better in the VI. Fuel economy far better. The Mark VI will always be remembered as the little Mark. I prefer the 4-door. Now that was a rebadged T-Bird — where as the Mark VI clearly continued the old traditional style — sadly in a smaller appearance. I must disagree wholeheartedly with your coverage of the mark VI.

I own a continental mark VI Emilio Pucci designer series. It is an all original vehicle, complete with 8 track, CB radio. To me, it is exactly what a luxury car should be, long, elegant, and superior to other vehicles on the road. I also own a Cadillac sedan deville. I realize they are a decade apart, but I would rather drive my Lincoln over my caddy any day of the week! She is a definite head turner! Your subject car is in sad shape, but can be made into an elegant machine again!

The results were many times…awkward at best. Big cars were now smaller and under-powered. Plastics intended to lighten the car seemed cheap and often was. This hurt American Luxo sales for sure. The Mark VI still stands out to me as special. Its limited run and customization options in my opinion make this a collectible car going forward. It was sharp, well proportioned and nicer than other personal luxuries.

Dudes drove those were view as arrived, or at least going places. Our eyes are more used to something a bit smaller? I just purchased one of Fords blunders. An Lincoln Continental Mark vi sedan. Has only original, owned by an old farmer in Alberta. Ugly but Cool.

It is a very clean car, back seat never sat in, engine block still has all the Ford blue paint. A great cruiser in todays market. I love my mark vi. Runs good. Ample power from the 5. It turns heads and for me is the perfect car.

It drivers better than the older models and is OK on gas. Its like a pimpped town car. The essense of what a Lincoln should be. This review is overly harsh. My 83 signature series mark vi continental is an excellent car. On the longer wheelbase it is elegant and well proportioned. The flip up lights are an improvement on the boring town car front end. The fenders look sporty with three shark gills.

The round opera window looks and functions better than the square town car window and the tire hump adds style to the rear. This car with its throttle body injection and dual exhausts is faster than my 88 and 79 town cars and rides and handles excellently. Markeisha has many nice touches. Digital dash. Power locks. Brake release. Power seats with recliners. Nice radio. Power trunk. Power antennae. Cornering ligjts.

Keyless entry. Loud horn tilt wheel. Auto dim mirror. Power mirrors. Auto dim and headlights. What more do you need or want. This car gets all kind of attention. Its beautiful and solid and reliable. It looks like the perfect car for a head of state or a mafia son. Fat tony on the Simpsons has one. When you ride in a mark vi its something special and I consider it one of the finest car ever made.

And it will take a hit too. No sawed off Reagan bumpers on this like the 85s on up. You are safe in one of these. The engine is proven and strong. Better than a Cadillac. Best of the best. Gas mileage is OK. If Lincoln still made this it would be the car to have. Haters be damned. This is a fine and beautiful car and hits the mark. Its the last real mark. Share the love for the undisputed queen of the panthers. Growing up in the 80s, the Mark VI was always one of my favorite cars, and is still one of my favorite Lincolns of all time.

I always liked the opera windows, hidden headlights and tire hump, and the four door, to me, represents everything that a Lincoln should be. Lincoln ruined the Mark with the VII… no oval windows or hidden headlights, it was so little and foreign looking right down to the console and floor shifter inside, yuck. I have found over the years the best comments come from those with true perspective earned from being there and done that.

I feel honored to have it. Everything works on it, and it can be used as a daily driver. I must say the most trouble free and enjoyable where the 79 and 81 or the Mark V and VI. Between these two, I would favor the Mark VI simply because it starts easily with the fuel injection, gets better mileage and it is more garageable if there is such a word.

As to perspective, I remember well these cars on the show room floor and thinking how beautiful they looked. I was surprised Ford could offer so much with all the down sizing going on, yet provide really excellent gas mileage in the middle of the fuel crisis. Someone should know these answers. Only damaged passenger door and rear quarter panel. We do not want Salvage Title and DO want the car repaired, have found replacement parts from junk car.

Our Insurance State Farm said deal with Hartford. Not Pucci or Blass or any known Designer Series. They are researching it but they have said that for the past 25 years and we never get any answers back from them. Does anyone know what this all means and what we should do.

We suppose we need an Appraisal, however, every Appraiser we talk to does not know what this Specialty tag means or a value for the car, as just a regular 83 M6 it is not. Any help will be much appreciated. Its all going to be about the appraisal. My uninformed 2 cents is that the special auto show build might be worth something on a highly collectible car but isnt going to get you much on a Mark VI.

I would guess its all about miles and condition. I wonder if someone in the Lincoln Continental Owners Club could steer you to an appraiser. Also, however high your appraisal is, an insurer will likely have a lower one and you will end up somewhere between.

If the repair estimate is anywhere near the appraised value, any insurance company will total the car. If the salvage title is that big of an issue and im not sure it is on a car of this age and value if everything is well documented you could always do repairs out of pocket and take a deduction on your taxes for a casualty loss. Regular auto insurance is not really a good fit with specialty cars, as the adjusters typically have little experience with them and spend their lives with everyone claiming that his old clunker is a classic worth a bazillion bucks.

It deletes the oval window and gives you a narrower quarter window than standard, plus an extra side light for the roof. Hope the repairs are coming along well,. That value seems way low. I paid for my 83 with miles which needed exhaust, front brakes, calipers, fuel pump, seat switch, mirror switch, auto lamp sensor and tires.

I feel I got a good deal since I do the work my self and the body and interior and drive train was mint. I see cars like mine to Yours is way lower in miles. Seen those on line around They are way low. She paid for it 2 years ago. His exploder was rusted out and the paint was peeling and it ran poorly.

This car is worth way more. I was in an accident and got cut off by a woman in a Bonneville. It was her fault. My car had a broken parking light. Loosened bumper rub strip and a couple minor scratches on the fender. They said car was not a total and advised it was worth It is a rare and beautiful car.

Does not take miles into consideration. Great Comments guys. I will check out Lincoln Continental Owners Club for any info they might have. We have paid State Farm for Full Coverage Insurance for 30 years on this car even though it sat in garage. I was not too smart in not checking out better insurance, but that is first thing on my list for our 65 Mustang as soon as it is out of paint shop. The car has been licensed and titled in Alaska since new. Try lincolnland in Clearwater fl. They may be able to help with your?

S and help with unobtanium parts. Your car resembles a 2 door version of mine. Is it a signature series? Not sure if SIG coupes had opera window or not. Try website grandmarq. The have an excellent Lincoln section even though site is nominally grand marquis. Best panther body site I found. He certainly lacks knowledge and experence about luxury cars. After all it does take an upper incme level to purchase and enjoyin a comfortable life style. I took the car from miles to miles when I then was able to buy the very last four door Thunderbirf to be produced.

It was dark brown with the very lusurious brougham interior. This also was equipted with the anti lock braking system that was a rare option on these cars. The Lincoln Mark VI allows me to enjoy modern highway travel, along with drinving a classic car and I also enjoy very good fuel economy. One of mine is a Canadian model with the odotemer reading kilometers rather than miles and has factory dual exaust.

It does provide greater power than all my others with fuel injection and single exaust. I soeak from some 45 years of experence and from ownership of some 50 different Lincolns over the years. I also have owned some 12 CAdillacs and threee Imperials. I highly recomend this car as car to call a collector car and also enjoy it for weekend use and when a back up car is called for.

How would you compare the ride of the Mark VI to a 70s Continental? How does the ride and handling compare to a 90s Town Car? I would often catch him standing in the window staring at it. Just absolutely loved it. Lidded eyes, Kardashian butt, Gold anodized and polished snowflake legs. Snow white on white on white with navy inserts. There was always a new Caddie parked next to it as he replaced those every two years out of habit.

I swear they went un-noticed beside his Lincoln. I razzed that car as mercilessly as I did his toupee. I used to marvel though at the amount of unsung engineering went into that one year. Kevlar hood, Aluminum every where. A lot was tried that year and little was said.

But for the leather seats the interior felt cheap as dirt. Neoprene tree on the firewall. Ketchup can on the inner fender. In I bought a triple black 4dr Mark VI. Leather, Sunroof, factory wire wheels not hubcaps and a red pin stripe in mint condition. I was only 21 yrs old but that was the car of my dreams. I had people asking me to sell it to them.

I lived in Atlanta, Ga. Mark but never have I seen one that was like mine. Unfortunately, I got married and needed to find a place to live so I sold it. I continue to look for one that compares but have yet to find one. I even thought about buying one and redoing it to look like mine but parts are impossible to find, especially the Lincoln wire wheels.

Tho i must say when the carb is functioning it works very nicely.. Mine turns heads for sure.. Wish she were still stock some days but these do make great lowriders. I think you shred this car too severely. I am currently thinking about buying one in much better shape. I saw a Mark VI Cartier edition here in town and, yes, the styling is — well I will say it looks better in some colors than others. Some things I did not like about the Mark VI — the same cheap looking steering wheel that all Fords shared at the time.

The sound of the doors opening and closing, same sound as a Fairmont of the same vintage made. The sound of the headlamp doors closing with a solid CLANK, and the look of the front when the headlamp doors opened up after the car sat for a while.

My Mercury Marquis headlight doors closed nice and quietly. And nice ones cost considerably more than a VI. The picture attached is one I like! Just looking at the ridiculous, excessive overhang of the Mark V shows a culture in love with itself and not giving a damn! Time is on our side; just look at the growth of interest on websites and in prices—which are certainly on the upswing! Atleast the trunks on these mini marks are big enough to hold two 22 inch subs.

I did just that on a 81 mark vi coupe I inherited from my grandfather years ago. I ended up blowing out the windows on the mark when I was in a bass decibel competition one time! I swapped my subs into a 66 Caddy convertable I got a couple years ago. The body colour sheet metal and unfinished appearance in the detailing around the headlights looks so bad!

Even if it perhaps meant a flat black plastic headlight surround creating a cleaner appearance. That would at least downplay this area. Even as a kid, I used to always notice this unflattering area in 70s and 80s Lincolns. Especially noticeable with light coloured paint. I do agree that this mark is way ill proportioned. I do like the 4 door Mark a lot.

I have to wonder whether the priority in designing this Mark was to make it look smaller. It certainly achieved that. But as to fixing it to make it look right, where do we begin? The number one thing that offends my eye is the massive front overhang. That is ridiculous in a RWD car, and certainly impacts such considerations as weight distribution.

Where were the engineers when this thing was approved for production? The front wheels need to be pushed about four inches forward, possibly more. Alongside the standard Continental Mark VI, two additional trims were offered within the model line, including the Designer Editions and the flagship Signature Series.

For , the Signature Series was available in both coupe and sedan formats. Intended as a successor to the Collector's Series option package, the Signature Series included nearly every available feature as standard equipment.

The option was offered with either burgundy or silver exteriors; all vehicles came with a red interior leather or velour upholstery. Unique features included a rechargeable glove box flashlight, special seat sew pattern, gold and Macaser Ebony wood treatments and a complete digital instrument cluster with fully electronically controlled EEC III engine with a 4-speed AOD, and a leather-bound tool kit in the trunk.

The Signature Series returned for ; red and silver exteriors were again offered, with black and white exterior colors becoming an option near the end of the model year. As with , all examples were produced with red interiors, in leather or velour. For and , the Mark VI Signature Series underwent a revision, as it became available in any exterior and interior color offered for the Mark VI. The tool kit and glove box flashlight were no longer featured as well. As before, each Designer Series option carried exclusive exterior and interior color combination and additional equipment over the standard-trim Mark VI; these trim packages remained unchanged through For , the series underwent a shuffle of sorts, with the Pucci edition moving from the sedan from the coupe.

For , the Givenchy Edition was shifted to the Continental, leaving the Bill Blass coupe and Pucci sedan; a coupe version of the Pucci edition made its return as a mid-year introduction. Sold exclusively in China. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Main article: Lincoln Mark series. Motor vehicle. Retrieved Authority control: National libraries United States.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Wikimedia Commons. Lincoln Ford. John Aiken [1]. Full-size personal luxury car. FR layout , body-on-frame. Ford Panther platform. Lincoln Continental Lincoln Town Car — Continental Mark V. Continental Mark VII. Ford Windsor V8 5. Ford Windsor V8 W [3]. Town Car. Personal luxury car.

Lincoln continental 1983 scp 515

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Interested in driving and possibly purchasing your Burgundy Mark VI picture please text call me at and how many miles on her? This is a 5 year old comment, so you may not get a response. I am not sure that he was selling these cars anyhow. I agree… I think this color combo on this car is absolute perfection. I always loved the Mark VI! Considering this…. As far as the designer editions were concerned, does anyone think that Lincoln actually dragged Blass, Givenchy, Pucci, the Cartier people, etc.

Or do you think it was just a license to use their respective names and logos and Lincoln just applied whatever they wanted as far as color schemes and features? I think NOT!! Advantage: Mark VI. I wonder that about a lot of celebrity-branded products: Is it just a matter of paying royalties, or do they get some sort of veto authority, at least?

For a long time, I wondered who the heck Bill Blass was. Or Eddie Bauer for that matter. It all depends on the celeb and the product. He oversaw a majority of the items made available for sale. Then they sent them back with color samples and called it good. Personally I like the VI in 2dr form. I do check for these on CL from time to time, the only problem is like the featured car the always have 1 and sometimes 2 of the parking light lenses missing.

But the blue and white Bill Blass would also do. Drop it on an Aero Panther chassis and add a 32v 4. Admittedly not a high bar. I could almost do a 4 door one of these. For the complete opposite reason — the hidden headlights look better than the exposed units on the Town Car. A Town Car with a different front end.

Then I would drive the early 80s lowest of the LoPo s and would immediately run away. If you are going to have an ugly car, go big or go home. As far as engines go the article Craig linked to showed that the powered CV actually was quicker than the powered Caprice in The Ford was over 12 seconds to 60 and the Caprice was a little over Not surprising considering the made 26 more HP than the and more torque with a wider power band.

After they lose the chrome, boxiness, and real bumpers in the early 90s, I lose interest. For sure. And Cadillac too, even if their cars looked better at the time. The flagship models Town Car, Fleetwood Brougham were backward looking…smaller cars imitating their bigger 70s predecessors, but with slower engines, cheaper materials, and at times, less reliability.

The result? More and more, the people who wanted to buy them were the people who just wanted something that kind of reminded them of the cars they drove in the 70s, but could get 20 mpg. You could see this in the brochures increasingly portrayed the drivers of the big cars as older, whereas in the early 80s they still pictured younger yuppie couples standing by their Cadillacs and Lincolns. These were bizarre cars when I was a kid.

The 85 up town cars were even more confusing since they kind of sort of gained the sloping tail of the Mark, sans the hump of course. Too bad I failed geometry the first go around though, I was too busy trying to figure this out! Most downsized Fords suffered similarly but even the Thunderbird was at least restyled. The Mark simply seemed to have the existing Mark V body dies shrunken for the Panther platform and nothing more. If these sold in better numbers that could have been a real widespread problem!

The 2-door ones have four. I imagine the Mark VII may have had it too. Always thought that was a cool feature. The vents were controlled by the same switch as the window. Holding the down button opens the vent first, then the window if you continue to hold the button. The 6 switches you see on 4 doors are 4 for the window, one for for the door locks, and one for the window lockout.

In the Panther era, it was on Lincoln products only. Some Panthers had vent windows, but the regular swing-out type. I am going to be in the minority here…while I dislike the downsizing of these malaise cars I love malaise cars…not gonna lie , I still liked these. That is going to be the car that turns heads. And, I like unique.

I simply love angularity. Have you guys ever driven a Mark VI? If not, you should do so. NO ONE ever believes here that these functions were available in Not talking about interior space. Far better in the VI. Fuel economy far better. The Mark VI will always be remembered as the little Mark. I prefer the 4-door. Now that was a rebadged T-Bird — where as the Mark VI clearly continued the old traditional style — sadly in a smaller appearance. I must disagree wholeheartedly with your coverage of the mark VI.

I own a continental mark VI Emilio Pucci designer series. It is an all original vehicle, complete with 8 track, CB radio. To me, it is exactly what a luxury car should be, long, elegant, and superior to other vehicles on the road. I also own a Cadillac sedan deville. I realize they are a decade apart, but I would rather drive my Lincoln over my caddy any day of the week!

She is a definite head turner! Your subject car is in sad shape, but can be made into an elegant machine again! The results were many times…awkward at best. Big cars were now smaller and under-powered. Plastics intended to lighten the car seemed cheap and often was. This hurt American Luxo sales for sure.

The Mark VI still stands out to me as special. Its limited run and customization options in my opinion make this a collectible car going forward. It was sharp, well proportioned and nicer than other personal luxuries. Dudes drove those were view as arrived, or at least going places. Our eyes are more used to something a bit smaller? I just purchased one of Fords blunders. An Lincoln Continental Mark vi sedan. Has only original, owned by an old farmer in Alberta.

Ugly but Cool. It is a very clean car, back seat never sat in, engine block still has all the Ford blue paint. A great cruiser in todays market. I love my mark vi. Runs good. Ample power from the 5. It turns heads and for me is the perfect car. It drivers better than the older models and is OK on gas. Its like a pimpped town car. The essense of what a Lincoln should be. This review is overly harsh. My 83 signature series mark vi continental is an excellent car.

On the longer wheelbase it is elegant and well proportioned. The flip up lights are an improvement on the boring town car front end. The fenders look sporty with three shark gills. The round opera window looks and functions better than the square town car window and the tire hump adds style to the rear. This car with its throttle body injection and dual exhausts is faster than my 88 and 79 town cars and rides and handles excellently. Markeisha has many nice touches. Digital dash. Power locks.

Brake release. Power seats with recliners. Nice radio. Power trunk. Power antennae. Cornering ligjts. Keyless entry. Loud horn tilt wheel. Auto dim mirror. Power mirrors. Auto dim and headlights. What more do you need or want. This car gets all kind of attention. Its beautiful and solid and reliable. It looks like the perfect car for a head of state or a mafia son. Fat tony on the Simpsons has one. When you ride in a mark vi its something special and I consider it one of the finest car ever made.

And it will take a hit too. No sawed off Reagan bumpers on this like the 85s on up. You are safe in one of these. The engine is proven and strong. Better than a Cadillac. Best of the best. Gas mileage is OK. If Lincoln still made this it would be the car to have. Haters be damned. This is a fine and beautiful car and hits the mark. Its the last real mark. Share the love for the undisputed queen of the panthers.

Growing up in the 80s, the Mark VI was always one of my favorite cars, and is still one of my favorite Lincolns of all time. I always liked the opera windows, hidden headlights and tire hump, and the four door, to me, represents everything that a Lincoln should be.

Lincoln ruined the Mark with the VII… no oval windows or hidden headlights, it was so little and foreign looking right down to the console and floor shifter inside, yuck. I have found over the years the best comments come from those with true perspective earned from being there and done that.

I feel honored to have it. Everything works on it, and it can be used as a daily driver. I must say the most trouble free and enjoyable where the 79 and 81 or the Mark V and VI. Between these two, I would favor the Mark VI simply because it starts easily with the fuel injection, gets better mileage and it is more garageable if there is such a word. As to perspective, I remember well these cars on the show room floor and thinking how beautiful they looked.

I was surprised Ford could offer so much with all the down sizing going on, yet provide really excellent gas mileage in the middle of the fuel crisis. Someone should know these answers. Only damaged passenger door and rear quarter panel. We do not want Salvage Title and DO want the car repaired, have found replacement parts from junk car. Our Insurance State Farm said deal with Hartford.

Not Pucci or Blass or any known Designer Series. They are researching it but they have said that for the past 25 years and we never get any answers back from them. Does anyone know what this all means and what we should do. We suppose we need an Appraisal, however, every Appraiser we talk to does not know what this Specialty tag means or a value for the car, as just a regular 83 M6 it is not. Any help will be much appreciated. Its all going to be about the appraisal.

My uninformed 2 cents is that the special auto show build might be worth something on a highly collectible car but isnt going to get you much on a Mark VI. I would guess its all about miles and condition. I wonder if someone in the Lincoln Continental Owners Club could steer you to an appraiser.

Also, however high your appraisal is, an insurer will likely have a lower one and you will end up somewhere between. If the repair estimate is anywhere near the appraised value, any insurance company will total the car. If the salvage title is that big of an issue and im not sure it is on a car of this age and value if everything is well documented you could always do repairs out of pocket and take a deduction on your taxes for a casualty loss.

Regular auto insurance is not really a good fit with specialty cars, as the adjusters typically have little experience with them and spend their lives with everyone claiming that his old clunker is a classic worth a bazillion bucks. It deletes the oval window and gives you a narrower quarter window than standard, plus an extra side light for the roof.

Hope the repairs are coming along well,. That value seems way low. I paid for my 83 with miles which needed exhaust, front brakes, calipers, fuel pump, seat switch, mirror switch, auto lamp sensor and tires. I feel I got a good deal since I do the work my self and the body and interior and drive train was mint. I see cars like mine to Yours is way lower in miles. Seen those on line around They are way low.

She paid for it 2 years ago. His exploder was rusted out and the paint was peeling and it ran poorly. This car is worth way more. I was in an accident and got cut off by a woman in a Bonneville. It was her fault. My car had a broken parking light. Loosened bumper rub strip and a couple minor scratches on the fender.

They said car was not a total and advised it was worth It is a rare and beautiful car. Does not take miles into consideration. Great Comments guys. I will check out Lincoln Continental Owners Club for any info they might have.

We have paid State Farm for Full Coverage Insurance for 30 years on this car even though it sat in garage. I was not too smart in not checking out better insurance, but that is first thing on my list for our 65 Mustang as soon as it is out of paint shop. The car has been licensed and titled in Alaska since new.

Try lincolnland in Clearwater fl. They may be able to help with your? S and help with unobtanium parts. Your car resembles a 2 door version of mine. Is it a signature series? Not sure if SIG coupes had opera window or not. Try website grandmarq. The have an excellent Lincoln section even though site is nominally grand marquis.

Best panther body site I found. He certainly lacks knowledge and experence about luxury cars. After all it does take an upper incme level to purchase and enjoyin a comfortable life style. I took the car from miles to miles when I then was able to buy the very last four door Thunderbirf to be produced. It was dark brown with the very lusurious brougham interior. This also was equipted with the anti lock braking system that was a rare option on these cars.

The Lincoln Mark VI allows me to enjoy modern highway travel, along with drinving a classic car and I also enjoy very good fuel economy. One of mine is a Canadian model with the odotemer reading kilometers rather than miles and has factory dual exaust. It does provide greater power than all my others with fuel injection and single exaust. I soeak from some 45 years of experence and from ownership of some 50 different Lincolns over the years.

I also have owned some 12 CAdillacs and threee Imperials. I highly recomend this car as car to call a collector car and also enjoy it for weekend use and when a back up car is called for. How would you compare the ride of the Mark VI to a 70s Continental?

How does the ride and handling compare to a 90s Town Car? I would often catch him standing in the window staring at it. Just absolutely loved it. Lidded eyes, Kardashian butt, Gold anodized and polished snowflake legs. Snow white on white on white with navy inserts. There was always a new Caddie parked next to it as he replaced those every two years out of habit.

I swear they went un-noticed beside his Lincoln. I razzed that car as mercilessly as I did his toupee. I used to marvel though at the amount of unsung engineering went into that one year. Kevlar hood, Aluminum every where. A lot was tried that year and little was said. But for the leather seats the interior felt cheap as dirt. Neoprene tree on the firewall. Ketchup can on the inner fender.

In I bought a triple black 4dr Mark VI. Leather, Sunroof, factory wire wheels not hubcaps and a red pin stripe in mint condition. I was only 21 yrs old but that was the car of my dreams. I had people asking me to sell it to them. I lived in Atlanta, Ga. Mark but never have I seen one that was like mine.

Unfortunately, I got married and needed to find a place to live so I sold it. I continue to look for one that compares but have yet to find one. I even thought about buying one and redoing it to look like mine but parts are impossible to find, especially the Lincoln wire wheels.

Tho i must say when the carb is functioning it works very nicely.. Mine turns heads for sure.. Wish she were still stock some days but these do make great lowriders. I think you shred this car too severely. I am currently thinking about buying one in much better shape. I saw a Mark VI Cartier edition here in town and, yes, the styling is — well I will say it looks better in some colors than others.

Some things I did not like about the Mark VI — the same cheap looking steering wheel that all Fords shared at the time. The sound of the doors opening and closing, same sound as a Fairmont of the same vintage made. The sound of the headlamp doors closing with a solid CLANK, and the look of the front when the headlamp doors opened up after the car sat for a while.

My Mercury Marquis headlight doors closed nice and quietly. And nice ones cost considerably more than a VI. The picture attached is one I like! Just looking at the ridiculous, excessive overhang of the Mark V shows a culture in love with itself and not giving a damn! Time is on our side; just look at the growth of interest on websites and in prices—which are certainly on the upswing!

Atleast the trunks on these mini marks are big enough to hold two 22 inch subs. I did just that on a 81 mark vi coupe I inherited from my grandfather years ago. I ended up blowing out the windows on the mark when I was in a bass decibel competition one time! I swapped my subs into a 66 Caddy convertable I got a couple years ago. The body colour sheet metal and unfinished appearance in the detailing around the headlights looks so bad!

Even if it perhaps meant a flat black plastic headlight surround creating a cleaner appearance. That would at least downplay this area. Even as a kid, I used to always notice this unflattering area in 70s and 80s Lincolns. Especially noticeable with light coloured paint. I do agree that this mark is way ill proportioned. I do like the 4 door Mark a lot. I have to wonder whether the priority in designing this Mark was to make it look smaller.

It certainly achieved that. But as to fixing it to make it look right, where do we begin? The number one thing that offends my eye is the massive front overhang. That is ridiculous in a RWD car, and certainly impacts such considerations as weight distribution. Where were the engineers when this thing was approved for production?

The front wheels need to be pushed about four inches forward, possibly more. Building this thing on the longer chassis would be a step in the right direction. It may not be feasible to lower the roof, but adding some more rake to the front and rear screens would return some of the sleekness of the previous Mark.

Especially the rear screen, and rake the rear side window to match. And by the way — lose that vertical chrome accent on the B-pillar. Yes, chrome would look more prestigious than a bare pillar, but think. A heavy vertical chrome accent or a pair of thin ones on an otherwise sleek design is a like visual barb.

Instead of seeing the car as a cohesive whole, the eye views it as two halves. If it must be there for framed windows the pillar should be thinner too, avoiding the sense of deeply-sunken windows. We had one when I was growing up.

I have much to say, but will limit myself. We really enjoyed this car when I was 12 or Ours was white, 4 doors, with a maroon velvet interior and moonroof. It came with a Ford branded cassette tape with a variety of pop song selections to enjoy the Premium Sound System. It looked sharp. We loved to blast the provided Peter Gunn theme with all windows and moonroof open…. In late , my widowed mother asked me to come down from Austin for the weekend so she could look at the Imperials at Bill Heil Chrysler in San Antonio.

She happily drove that Imperial until late when the new Chrysler Imperial came out. Was never a fan of these cars during this time era and the same extends to the Cordoba. Too boxy and overwrought and way too much gaudy tacky exterior trim plus those weird unfinished headlights. I totally disagree with your assessment. For one, look at what GM did during the same period. At the time, Lincolns were redesigned and were selling like hot cakes versus Cadilacs.

They were even advertising Lincoln, as what a Luxury Car should be. Sure Lincoln downsized, everyone had to. It is just your opinion, not everyone agrees with yours. These were beautiful cars and they had a presence which spoke quiet eleqance.

I do not dispute that they had their good points. But the and experiences you had were probably much better than the cars which were not without their powertrain issues. The market spoke on these cars. Just like it would in when those awful small Cadillacs came out. Both the Mark V that preceded it and the Mark VII that followed it carried out the personal luxury mission much more effectively, both because of their mechanical attributes as well as their styling and luxury presence.

I freely admit that my dislike for these which remains strong is colored by much time spent around Lincolns of the s. But these were poor substitutes for the Lincolns that had been offered in prior decades. Your well-researched and professionally-written article still makes my stomach turn. It is obvious that you despise the styling efforts of the Mark VI which, in a way, means the companion Town Car that was really only a trim variation. But at least be fair; the article—pictorially—looks as if you went out of your way to find photographs of the poorest, most derelict, flat-tired examples.

Why not be fair and replace those photographs with some of the beautifully maintained or restored examples of which you may find a plethora on the Lincoln Town Car and Continental Mark VI Facebook Website. To me and to hundreds of others , these cars were magnificently conceived, offering a dependable and fairly economical way of enjoying the Lincoln legacy. In fact, their conception was downright revolutionary and evolutionary…and at a savings of, as you point out, over pounds.

Time is beginning to show that your opinion may be in the minority. However, I do commend you for the factual side of this excellent and only well-researched history. That you would even write it shows the importance of the Lincoln automobile to culture and preservation, and that, my colleague includes the Town Cars and the Mark VI!

Note, an un-retouched photograph of the interior of my recently acquired Mark VI accompanies this text. This car was last registered in While giving a soft glow, they did not provide sufficient light to drive in dark conditions and did not function as daytime running lights. This generation was also installed with Ford's " Auto Lamp " feature, and if the system was active, the touring lights would not be used when the conventional headlights came on stowing the touring lights.

Each Mark VI was also equipped with parking lights integrated with the front turn signals, so the addition of the optional touring lights was a styling flourish. Alongside the standard Continental Mark VI, two additional trims were offered within the model line, including the Designer Editions and the flagship Signature Series.

For , the Signature Series was available in both coupe and sedan formats. Intended as a successor to the Collector's Series option package, the Signature Series included nearly every available feature as standard equipment. The option was offered with either burgundy or silver exteriors; all vehicles came with a red interior leather or velour upholstery. Unique features included a rechargeable glove box flashlight, special seat sew pattern, gold and Macaser Ebony wood treatments and a complete digital instrument cluster with fully electronically controlled EEC III engine with a 4-speed AOD, and a leather-bound tool kit in the trunk.

The Signature Series returned for ; red and silver exteriors were again offered, with black and white exterior colors becoming an option near the end of the model year. As with , all examples were produced with red interiors, in leather or velour. For and , the Mark VI Signature Series underwent a revision, as it became available in any exterior and interior color offered for the Mark VI.

The tool kit and glove box flashlight were no longer featured as well. As before, each Designer Series option carried exclusive exterior and interior color combination and additional equipment over the standard-trim Mark VI; these trim packages remained unchanged through For , the series underwent a shuffle of sorts, with the Pucci edition moving from the sedan from the coupe.

For , the Givenchy Edition was shifted to the Continental, leaving the Bill Blass coupe and Pucci sedan; a coupe version of the Pucci edition made its return as a mid-year introduction. Sold exclusively in China. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Main article: Lincoln Mark series. Motor vehicle. Retrieved Authority control: National libraries United States.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Wikimedia Commons. Lincoln Ford. John Aiken [1]. Full-size personal luxury car. FR layout , body-on-frame. Ford Panther platform. Lincoln Continental Lincoln Town Car — Continental Mark V.

Continental Mark VII. Ford Windsor V8 5.

Lincoln continental 1983 disowned

Test Drive 1983 Lincoln Continental Velentino Designer Series BID TO WIN! lincoln continental 1983

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Advantage: Mark VI. I wonder that about a lot of celebrity-branded products: Is it just a matter of paying royalties, or do they get some sort of veto authority, at least? For a long time, I wondered who the heck Bill Blass was. Or Eddie Bauer for that matter. It all depends on the celeb and the product. He oversaw a majority of the items made available for sale. Then they sent them back with color samples and called it good. Personally I like the VI in 2dr form.

I do check for these on CL from time to time, the only problem is like the featured car the always have 1 and sometimes 2 of the parking light lenses missing. But the blue and white Bill Blass would also do. Drop it on an Aero Panther chassis and add a 32v 4.

Admittedly not a high bar. I could almost do a 4 door one of these. For the complete opposite reason — the hidden headlights look better than the exposed units on the Town Car. A Town Car with a different front end.

Then I would drive the early 80s lowest of the LoPo s and would immediately run away. If you are going to have an ugly car, go big or go home. As far as engines go the article Craig linked to showed that the powered CV actually was quicker than the powered Caprice in The Ford was over 12 seconds to 60 and the Caprice was a little over Not surprising considering the made 26 more HP than the and more torque with a wider power band.

After they lose the chrome, boxiness, and real bumpers in the early 90s, I lose interest. For sure. And Cadillac too, even if their cars looked better at the time. The flagship models Town Car, Fleetwood Brougham were backward looking…smaller cars imitating their bigger 70s predecessors, but with slower engines, cheaper materials, and at times, less reliability. The result?

More and more, the people who wanted to buy them were the people who just wanted something that kind of reminded them of the cars they drove in the 70s, but could get 20 mpg. You could see this in the brochures increasingly portrayed the drivers of the big cars as older, whereas in the early 80s they still pictured younger yuppie couples standing by their Cadillacs and Lincolns.

These were bizarre cars when I was a kid. The 85 up town cars were even more confusing since they kind of sort of gained the sloping tail of the Mark, sans the hump of course. Too bad I failed geometry the first go around though, I was too busy trying to figure this out! Most downsized Fords suffered similarly but even the Thunderbird was at least restyled.

The Mark simply seemed to have the existing Mark V body dies shrunken for the Panther platform and nothing more. If these sold in better numbers that could have been a real widespread problem! The 2-door ones have four. I imagine the Mark VII may have had it too.

Always thought that was a cool feature. The vents were controlled by the same switch as the window. Holding the down button opens the vent first, then the window if you continue to hold the button. The 6 switches you see on 4 doors are 4 for the window, one for for the door locks, and one for the window lockout. In the Panther era, it was on Lincoln products only. Some Panthers had vent windows, but the regular swing-out type.

I am going to be in the minority here…while I dislike the downsizing of these malaise cars I love malaise cars…not gonna lie , I still liked these. That is going to be the car that turns heads. And, I like unique. I simply love angularity. Have you guys ever driven a Mark VI? If not, you should do so. NO ONE ever believes here that these functions were available in Not talking about interior space.

Far better in the VI. Fuel economy far better. The Mark VI will always be remembered as the little Mark. I prefer the 4-door. Now that was a rebadged T-Bird — where as the Mark VI clearly continued the old traditional style — sadly in a smaller appearance. I must disagree wholeheartedly with your coverage of the mark VI.

I own a continental mark VI Emilio Pucci designer series. It is an all original vehicle, complete with 8 track, CB radio. To me, it is exactly what a luxury car should be, long, elegant, and superior to other vehicles on the road. I also own a Cadillac sedan deville. I realize they are a decade apart, but I would rather drive my Lincoln over my caddy any day of the week! She is a definite head turner!

Your subject car is in sad shape, but can be made into an elegant machine again! The results were many times…awkward at best. Big cars were now smaller and under-powered. Plastics intended to lighten the car seemed cheap and often was. This hurt American Luxo sales for sure. The Mark VI still stands out to me as special. Its limited run and customization options in my opinion make this a collectible car going forward. It was sharp, well proportioned and nicer than other personal luxuries.

Dudes drove those were view as arrived, or at least going places. Our eyes are more used to something a bit smaller? I just purchased one of Fords blunders. An Lincoln Continental Mark vi sedan. Has only original, owned by an old farmer in Alberta. Ugly but Cool. It is a very clean car, back seat never sat in, engine block still has all the Ford blue paint. A great cruiser in todays market. I love my mark vi. Runs good. Ample power from the 5. It turns heads and for me is the perfect car.

It drivers better than the older models and is OK on gas. Its like a pimpped town car. The essense of what a Lincoln should be. This review is overly harsh. My 83 signature series mark vi continental is an excellent car. On the longer wheelbase it is elegant and well proportioned. The flip up lights are an improvement on the boring town car front end. The fenders look sporty with three shark gills. The round opera window looks and functions better than the square town car window and the tire hump adds style to the rear.

This car with its throttle body injection and dual exhausts is faster than my 88 and 79 town cars and rides and handles excellently. Markeisha has many nice touches. Digital dash. Power locks. Brake release. Power seats with recliners. Nice radio. Power trunk. Power antennae. Cornering ligjts. Keyless entry. Loud horn tilt wheel.

Auto dim mirror. Power mirrors. Auto dim and headlights. What more do you need or want. This car gets all kind of attention. Its beautiful and solid and reliable. It looks like the perfect car for a head of state or a mafia son.

Fat tony on the Simpsons has one. When you ride in a mark vi its something special and I consider it one of the finest car ever made. And it will take a hit too. No sawed off Reagan bumpers on this like the 85s on up. You are safe in one of these. The engine is proven and strong. Better than a Cadillac. Best of the best. Gas mileage is OK. If Lincoln still made this it would be the car to have. Haters be damned. This is a fine and beautiful car and hits the mark.

Its the last real mark. Share the love for the undisputed queen of the panthers. Growing up in the 80s, the Mark VI was always one of my favorite cars, and is still one of my favorite Lincolns of all time. I always liked the opera windows, hidden headlights and tire hump, and the four door, to me, represents everything that a Lincoln should be.

Lincoln ruined the Mark with the VII… no oval windows or hidden headlights, it was so little and foreign looking right down to the console and floor shifter inside, yuck. I have found over the years the best comments come from those with true perspective earned from being there and done that. I feel honored to have it. Everything works on it, and it can be used as a daily driver. I must say the most trouble free and enjoyable where the 79 and 81 or the Mark V and VI.

Between these two, I would favor the Mark VI simply because it starts easily with the fuel injection, gets better mileage and it is more garageable if there is such a word. As to perspective, I remember well these cars on the show room floor and thinking how beautiful they looked. I was surprised Ford could offer so much with all the down sizing going on, yet provide really excellent gas mileage in the middle of the fuel crisis.

Someone should know these answers. Only damaged passenger door and rear quarter panel. We do not want Salvage Title and DO want the car repaired, have found replacement parts from junk car. Our Insurance State Farm said deal with Hartford. Not Pucci or Blass or any known Designer Series. They are researching it but they have said that for the past 25 years and we never get any answers back from them. Does anyone know what this all means and what we should do. We suppose we need an Appraisal, however, every Appraiser we talk to does not know what this Specialty tag means or a value for the car, as just a regular 83 M6 it is not.

Any help will be much appreciated. Its all going to be about the appraisal. My uninformed 2 cents is that the special auto show build might be worth something on a highly collectible car but isnt going to get you much on a Mark VI. I would guess its all about miles and condition. I wonder if someone in the Lincoln Continental Owners Club could steer you to an appraiser. Also, however high your appraisal is, an insurer will likely have a lower one and you will end up somewhere between. If the repair estimate is anywhere near the appraised value, any insurance company will total the car.

If the salvage title is that big of an issue and im not sure it is on a car of this age and value if everything is well documented you could always do repairs out of pocket and take a deduction on your taxes for a casualty loss. Regular auto insurance is not really a good fit with specialty cars, as the adjusters typically have little experience with them and spend their lives with everyone claiming that his old clunker is a classic worth a bazillion bucks.

It deletes the oval window and gives you a narrower quarter window than standard, plus an extra side light for the roof. Hope the repairs are coming along well,. That value seems way low. I paid for my 83 with miles which needed exhaust, front brakes, calipers, fuel pump, seat switch, mirror switch, auto lamp sensor and tires. I feel I got a good deal since I do the work my self and the body and interior and drive train was mint.

I see cars like mine to Yours is way lower in miles. Seen those on line around They are way low. She paid for it 2 years ago. His exploder was rusted out and the paint was peeling and it ran poorly. This car is worth way more. I was in an accident and got cut off by a woman in a Bonneville. It was her fault. My car had a broken parking light. Loosened bumper rub strip and a couple minor scratches on the fender.

They said car was not a total and advised it was worth It is a rare and beautiful car. Does not take miles into consideration. Great Comments guys. I will check out Lincoln Continental Owners Club for any info they might have. We have paid State Farm for Full Coverage Insurance for 30 years on this car even though it sat in garage. I was not too smart in not checking out better insurance, but that is first thing on my list for our 65 Mustang as soon as it is out of paint shop.

The car has been licensed and titled in Alaska since new. Try lincolnland in Clearwater fl. They may be able to help with your? S and help with unobtanium parts. Your car resembles a 2 door version of mine. Is it a signature series? Not sure if SIG coupes had opera window or not.

Try website grandmarq. The have an excellent Lincoln section even though site is nominally grand marquis. Best panther body site I found. He certainly lacks knowledge and experence about luxury cars. After all it does take an upper incme level to purchase and enjoyin a comfortable life style.

I took the car from miles to miles when I then was able to buy the very last four door Thunderbirf to be produced. It was dark brown with the very lusurious brougham interior. This also was equipted with the anti lock braking system that was a rare option on these cars. The Lincoln Mark VI allows me to enjoy modern highway travel, along with drinving a classic car and I also enjoy very good fuel economy. One of mine is a Canadian model with the odotemer reading kilometers rather than miles and has factory dual exaust.

It does provide greater power than all my others with fuel injection and single exaust. I soeak from some 45 years of experence and from ownership of some 50 different Lincolns over the years. I also have owned some 12 CAdillacs and threee Imperials.

I highly recomend this car as car to call a collector car and also enjoy it for weekend use and when a back up car is called for. How would you compare the ride of the Mark VI to a 70s Continental? How does the ride and handling compare to a 90s Town Car? I would often catch him standing in the window staring at it. Just absolutely loved it. Lidded eyes, Kardashian butt, Gold anodized and polished snowflake legs. Snow white on white on white with navy inserts. There was always a new Caddie parked next to it as he replaced those every two years out of habit.

I swear they went un-noticed beside his Lincoln. I razzed that car as mercilessly as I did his toupee. I used to marvel though at the amount of unsung engineering went into that one year. Kevlar hood, Aluminum every where.

A lot was tried that year and little was said. But for the leather seats the interior felt cheap as dirt. Neoprene tree on the firewall. Ketchup can on the inner fender. In I bought a triple black 4dr Mark VI. Leather, Sunroof, factory wire wheels not hubcaps and a red pin stripe in mint condition. I was only 21 yrs old but that was the car of my dreams. I had people asking me to sell it to them. I lived in Atlanta, Ga. Mark but never have I seen one that was like mine.

Unfortunately, I got married and needed to find a place to live so I sold it. I continue to look for one that compares but have yet to find one. I even thought about buying one and redoing it to look like mine but parts are impossible to find, especially the Lincoln wire wheels. Tho i must say when the carb is functioning it works very nicely.. Mine turns heads for sure.. Wish she were still stock some days but these do make great lowriders. I think you shred this car too severely.

I am currently thinking about buying one in much better shape. I saw a Mark VI Cartier edition here in town and, yes, the styling is — well I will say it looks better in some colors than others. Some things I did not like about the Mark VI — the same cheap looking steering wheel that all Fords shared at the time. The sound of the doors opening and closing, same sound as a Fairmont of the same vintage made.

The sound of the headlamp doors closing with a solid CLANK, and the look of the front when the headlamp doors opened up after the car sat for a while. My Mercury Marquis headlight doors closed nice and quietly. And nice ones cost considerably more than a VI. The picture attached is one I like! Just looking at the ridiculous, excessive overhang of the Mark V shows a culture in love with itself and not giving a damn!

Time is on our side; just look at the growth of interest on websites and in prices—which are certainly on the upswing! Atleast the trunks on these mini marks are big enough to hold two 22 inch subs. I did just that on a 81 mark vi coupe I inherited from my grandfather years ago. I ended up blowing out the windows on the mark when I was in a bass decibel competition one time! I swapped my subs into a 66 Caddy convertable I got a couple years ago. The body colour sheet metal and unfinished appearance in the detailing around the headlights looks so bad!

Even if it perhaps meant a flat black plastic headlight surround creating a cleaner appearance. That would at least downplay this area. Even as a kid, I used to always notice this unflattering area in 70s and 80s Lincolns. Especially noticeable with light coloured paint. I do agree that this mark is way ill proportioned. I do like the 4 door Mark a lot. I have to wonder whether the priority in designing this Mark was to make it look smaller.

It certainly achieved that. But as to fixing it to make it look right, where do we begin? The number one thing that offends my eye is the massive front overhang. That is ridiculous in a RWD car, and certainly impacts such considerations as weight distribution. Where were the engineers when this thing was approved for production? The front wheels need to be pushed about four inches forward, possibly more. Building this thing on the longer chassis would be a step in the right direction.

It may not be feasible to lower the roof, but adding some more rake to the front and rear screens would return some of the sleekness of the previous Mark. Especially the rear screen, and rake the rear side window to match. And by the way — lose that vertical chrome accent on the B-pillar. Yes, chrome would look more prestigious than a bare pillar, but think.

A heavy vertical chrome accent or a pair of thin ones on an otherwise sleek design is a like visual barb. Instead of seeing the car as a cohesive whole, the eye views it as two halves. If it must be there for framed windows the pillar should be thinner too, avoiding the sense of deeply-sunken windows. We had one when I was growing up. I have much to say, but will limit myself.

We really enjoyed this car when I was 12 or Ours was white, 4 doors, with a maroon velvet interior and moonroof. It came with a Ford branded cassette tape with a variety of pop song selections to enjoy the Premium Sound System. It looked sharp. We loved to blast the provided Peter Gunn theme with all windows and moonroof open….

In late , my widowed mother asked me to come down from Austin for the weekend so she could look at the Imperials at Bill Heil Chrysler in San Antonio. She happily drove that Imperial until late when the new Chrysler Imperial came out. Was never a fan of these cars during this time era and the same extends to the Cordoba. Too boxy and overwrought and way too much gaudy tacky exterior trim plus those weird unfinished headlights.

I totally disagree with your assessment. For one, look at what GM did during the same period. At the time, Lincolns were redesigned and were selling like hot cakes versus Cadilacs. They were even advertising Lincoln, as what a Luxury Car should be. Sure Lincoln downsized, everyone had to. It is just your opinion, not everyone agrees with yours. These were beautiful cars and they had a presence which spoke quiet eleqance.

I do not dispute that they had their good points. But the and experiences you had were probably much better than the cars which were not without their powertrain issues. The market spoke on these cars. Just like it would in when those awful small Cadillacs came out.

Both the Mark V that preceded it and the Mark VII that followed it carried out the personal luxury mission much more effectively, both because of their mechanical attributes as well as their styling and luxury presence. I freely admit that my dislike for these which remains strong is colored by much time spent around Lincolns of the s. But these were poor substitutes for the Lincolns that had been offered in prior decades.

Your well-researched and professionally-written article still makes my stomach turn. It is obvious that you despise the styling efforts of the Mark VI which, in a way, means the companion Town Car that was really only a trim variation. But at least be fair; the article—pictorially—looks as if you went out of your way to find photographs of the poorest, most derelict, flat-tired examples.

Why not be fair and replace those photographs with some of the beautifully maintained or restored examples of which you may find a plethora on the Lincoln Town Car and Continental Mark VI Facebook Website. To me and to hundreds of others , these cars were magnificently conceived, offering a dependable and fairly economical way of enjoying the Lincoln legacy.

In fact, their conception was downright revolutionary and evolutionary…and at a savings of, as you point out, over pounds. Time is beginning to show that your opinion may be in the minority. However, I do commend you for the factual side of this excellent and only well-researched history.

That you would even write it shows the importance of the Lincoln automobile to culture and preservation, and that, my colleague includes the Town Cars and the Mark VI! Note, an un-retouched photograph of the interior of my recently acquired Mark VI accompanies this text. This car was last registered in It was not garaged during this eleven year period.

It is as dry as a bone, and with a new battery and gas at engine-point it cranked right up and ran smoothly! What great cars are these and I ought to know; I have owned over 15 of the Town Cars and Marks—many of them were used for countless thousands of miles in my business. As a retired interior and architectural designer, I have ideas about style, harmony, balance and taste.

I am the recipient of ASID national and international awards. And, as it turns out, my ideas differ greatly from yours. Feel free to use mine. Does anyone recognize the silver Mark IV in the car show picture? Well pimped. The Mark VI is the only version of the Panther platform that is built on two different wheelbases.

The four-door sedan shares the In order to remain in compliance with increasingly stringent federal fuel economy standards under CAFE , Ford Motor Company was required to average The and cubic-inch V8s seen in the Mark V were replaced in favor of lower-displacement V8 engines. The standard engine for the Mark VI was a cubic-inch V8, producing hp. The first Ford V8 produced with fuel injection, the engine was marketed by its 5.

As an option, a cubic-inch 5. After , the was discontinued on the Mark VI, due to poor sales and the lack of a distinct power advantage over the 5. Both engines were paired to the AOD automatic transmission ; introduced for , the AOD replaced the commonly used 3-speed configuration with a 4-speed overdrive configuration, significantly lowering engine RPMs and fuel consumption at highway speeds. As the Mark V remained throughout its production, much of its sharp-edged design played a role in the design of the downsized Panther-platform Lincolns.

In line with its flagship model status, the Mark VI had more ornate styling than the Lincoln Town Car, including hidden headlamps, fender vents non-functional , C-pillar oval opera windows, and forward-sloping taillamps; the Continental tire trunklid returned nearly unchanged from the Mark V. The Mark VI also was one of the first cars seen with several features commonly seen today; it came with the all-new Keyless Entry System , digital instrumentation VFD , and trip computer.

Also, it was the first year for the EEC III engine management system which kept fuel economy high and emissions low, an industry first. As an unusual option, the Mark VI offered "touring lights", which mounted low-power lights on the hidden-headlamp doors. The touring lights were turned on when the headlight switch was in the parking light position.

While giving a soft glow, they did not provide sufficient light to drive in dark conditions and did not function as daytime running lights. This generation was also installed with Ford's " Auto Lamp " feature, and if the system was active, the touring lights would not be used when the conventional headlights came on stowing the touring lights. Each Mark VI was also equipped with parking lights integrated with the front turn signals, so the addition of the optional touring lights was a styling flourish.

Alongside the standard Continental Mark VI, two additional trims were offered within the model line, including the Designer Editions and the flagship Signature Series. For , the Signature Series was available in both coupe and sedan formats. Intended as a successor to the Collector's Series option package, the Signature Series included nearly every available feature as standard equipment.

The option was offered with either burgundy or silver exteriors; all vehicles came with a red interior leather or velour upholstery. Unique features included a rechargeable glove box flashlight, special seat sew pattern, gold and Macaser Ebony wood treatments and a complete digital instrument cluster with fully electronically controlled EEC III engine with a 4-speed AOD, and a leather-bound tool kit in the trunk.

The Signature Series returned for ; red and silver exteriors were again offered, with black and white exterior colors becoming an option near the end of the model year. As with , all examples were produced with red interiors, in leather or velour. For and , the Mark VI Signature Series underwent a revision, as it became available in any exterior and interior color offered for the Mark VI.

The tool kit and glove box flashlight were no longer featured as well. As before, each Designer Series option carried exclusive exterior and interior color combination and additional equipment over the standard-trim Mark VI; these trim packages remained unchanged through For , the series underwent a shuffle of sorts, with the Pucci edition moving from the sedan from the coupe.

For , the Givenchy Edition was shifted to the Continental, leaving the Bill Blass coupe and Pucci sedan; a coupe version of the Pucci edition made its return as a mid-year introduction. Sold exclusively in China. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Main article: Lincoln Mark series. Motor vehicle. Retrieved

Lincoln continental 1983 ost sims

1983 Lincoln Mark VI one owner all original survivor will 35k miles

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